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Handmade, hand-drawn, mismatched and collaged DIY Planners, binders, notebooks and calendars. Big plans, little plans – it all begins with… #diyplanner

Anybody else feel like nursing is one big guessing game? Pepper’s gaining weight though and seems pretty stuffed after eating, so… I guess we’re good! I still like tracking her feedings though, watching patterns emerge and knowing if she’s hungry or just fussy.

I looked around the internet for a printable breastfeeding log and they’re all pretty complicated, so I made a simple one. A free 8.5 x 11 breastfeeding log for tracking feed times, breast sides, poops and pees of your little newborn. I color in the triangle depending on which breast she feeds from first and make notes about naps on the right. Pretty boring, but it’s hard to color and draw while holding a little baby! :)

bf-log.pdf (2518 downloads) <- DOWNLOAD

*********Breastfeeding log updates here, new 4-up and 6-up versions.

And how could I do a post about breastfeeding without including a picture, she’s just SO cute!

A couple of weeks ago I posted 4×6 monthly & weekly diy planner templates and then the 4×6 Index Card Folder Tutorial. Below is a tutorial to create the little booklet made from 4×6 Index Cards that fits in the little folder!

Supplies

Directions

First, make sure your printer is set-up to print on 4×6 Index Cards – do a test run on a scrap sheet with the first page of the months-booklet.pdf (5813 downloads) . When it’s ready put 7 Index Cards in the printer and open the print dialog box. It might not look like my example but there should be a spot to select Odd Pages Only.

This will print pages 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13. When finished take your stack of cards, flip them over and put them back in the printer – making sure they’re the right direction. Then go into the print dialog and select Even Pages Only and print. This will print pages 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 on the other side of the Index Cards.

The first time I printed the booklet I used scrap paper and light/grayscale ink to test – especially since every printer is different. Also, if you want to print the calendar out and NOT make a booklet don’t use the above PDF – the left side doesn’t match up with the right side. :)

Once they’re all printed, fold each sheet in half. Use a bone folder, scissors or fat marker to smooth out the crease and get it nice and flat. Stack them all together and double check that they are in the right order. When looking at your opened stack the bottom page should be January then February, March, April, May, June and July. The first decorative page of the PDF will be the outside of the booklet.

When they’re stacked together, a glance from the top down will show you how uneven the edge of the booklet is. This is because of the width of the spine and varies depending on the thickness of your paper. I like to push the pages together and trim the edge of the booklet so it’s even.

I then went through every corner of the booklet and rounded it off, the inside corners too. This is optional!

Now it’s ready to bind together! A quick search on google will show you a million different ways to do this – since I’m lazy and love my sewing machine I just opened the stack up and stitched right down the middle to attach them all together.

I wanted to add some little tabs for fun, they’re mostly decorative and honestly don’t help with much functionally. I made a little mark on each page getting lower with each one. I then cut off a small slice below each mark down to the bottom. Redo the rounded punch on the bottom corner of each page and that’s it!

A simple 4×6 index card folder tutorial to hold your monthly, weekly and meeting diy planner templates!

This folder is very similar to the DIY Cardboard Binder, just a little smaller with binder clips and velcro instead of binder rings and elastic.

Supplies

  • Two sheets of heavy decorative scrapbook paper
  • Sewing machine or glue
  • Two binder clips
  • Small piece of velcro

Plans

4x6 velcro Index Card binder dimensions

Directions

Because the length of the folder needs to be 17 inches, I sewed some cut up 12×12 scrapbook sheets together to get there. If you have a sheet of 17″ paper or cardboard skip the first 4 steps and just cut two pieces of 4×17 rectangles.

  1. Take the 12×12 scrap book paper and cut it into 2 strips of 4 by 12.
  2. Cut two more pieces to 4 x 6.
  3. Take one 4×12 and one 4×6 and lay it out so that it’s 4×17 – giving you an inch overlap for gluing or sewing. This will be the inside of your folder.
  4. Repeat for the outside.
  5. Attach the front and back with glue or by sewing around the edges. Sewing gives the paper a more flexible and sturdy feel, it’s also fun to use the stitches as part of the design.
  6. At this point, you should have a double sided 4×17 rectangle. Mark lightly where the folds will go – see the dimensions diagram above. Finish decorating by drawing, stitching, painting, adding stickers or sprinkling with fairy dust! Keep in mind that we still have to make the folds, so your decoration should hold up to this.
  7. Next, add the three folds – hold a ruler against the fold mark on your desk and push the flap up against it, this will give you a nice straight fold. My paper split on one side during folding so I went over the fold with a wide zig zag stitch to reinforce the edges.
  8. The last step is to add velcro. Stitch one piece onto the inside right flap, then close the folder and line up the other side on the outside flap.

And you’re done! Use the binder clips to hold two stacks of 4×6 index cards (or the booklet pictured, tutorial and download here!) on each side.

4×6 index cards are the perfect size – big enough for taking notes/doodling and small enough to fit in your bag! Just finished this brand new 4×6 set, how cute and tiny right?!


Cost: Free
Size: Index Card – 4″ by 6″
File type: Adobe PDF
Included::

  • Fill-in-the-blank full month template, Jan-Dec
  • Fill-in-the-blank weekly template
  • Fill-in-the-blank meeting notes

Download: 4by6-2011.pdf (5897 downloads)


Some 4×6 tips:

  • Cutting up a piece of standard 12×12 scrap booking paper will make 6 (4×6) notecards with no waste!
  • Look for a 4×6 pack of index cards in an office supply store right next to the standard 3×5’s – cheap and easy!
  • Want to use 3×5? These scale perfectly, just set your printer to 3×5 and click ‘fit to page’
  • Browse through my binder tutorials for ideas on making a whole planner to fit!


Wait, there’s more!!

In the next day or two I’ll be posting a full tutorial on creating a little mini booklet from the 4″x6″ diy planner templates and a little velcro folder to hold it all. 4×6 index card folder tutorial here! AND 4×6 Monthly Booklet Tutorial

If you want to make a fast and easy binder this is it. You probably have all the parts to put it together just sitting around your house right now!

Supplies

  • Gluestick and hot glue gun
  • Flat Cardboard (not corrugated). Could be a cereal box, packaging or shoe box… get creative!
  • Cheap 2-ring 3×5 notecard binder, or any old small planner or binder
  • Pieces, parts, stickers, envelopes and scraps for collaging
  • File folders or thicker paper for dividers, heavy scrapbooking paper works great
  • DIY Planner Templates to fill the inside!

First, pull out the 2-ring binder clip from your 3×5 notebook. Directions for this and attaching the clip here. Decide what size paper you’d like, poke holes in it and hook it on the binder ring. Measure all the way around this – remember to measure for any tabs you’d like to include plus a little extra on the edges. This will be the width and height of Part A and Part C in the diagram above. The width of Part B should be as high as your binder clip plus a little extra. Part D can be whatever width you’d like really. It can be shorter and fold inside or outside, it can be wide as Part A and Part C or even a funky shape.

Once you figure out your sizes add the widths together and cut out one strip of cardboard. The cardboard I used was thinner than I would like so I cut out two pieces the same size and glued them together. Now make your folds, decorate and add the binder clip!

The pocket on Part A is optional. I cut out a piece of the same cardboard and attached it with hot glue on 3 sides. The closure is a piece of off-white elastic from Joann’s. Stretch it around the closed notebook to get the right length. Then cut two slits in the spine to feed it through. On the outside sew the ends together and you’re done.

Happy binding!

My wonderfully talented friend, Paperboat Captain, sent me a package all the way from Germany! Her new pocket calendar (1 bis 12 Taschenkalender), hand drawn and bound by her – view more pictures and buy your own right here! It’s even more gorgeous in person full of little details and perfect for planning and doodles!


I’ve been meaning to make a Weekly Planning template forever and can’t believe I haven’t before now. A single 8.5 x 11 weekly planner for jotting down all your wonderful weekly plans, lists and doodles. This free download contains two versions – one with space on the right and one with space on the left for double sided printing and hole punches. Happy planning!

2010-weekly.pdf (19330 downloads)

This is part three of the ‘Binder Series‘ –
Previous posts: The Bee Planner and The Repurposed Book Binder

Here are a few people and notebooks I’ve been inspired by in my Binder research!

Bastiano

One of my favorite book makers is Bastiano – if you want to see amazing stitch, collage and book art go here.


NYX Creations

NYX has put together a REALLY cool binder tutorial using binder rings, cardboard and collage.


Remains of the Day

I recently signed up for Remains of the Day by Mary Ann Moss, a ‘Shabby Journal of Scraps’ online tutorial site.

Mary Ann’s video tutorials focus a lot on laying out different fabrics, book binding and creating paper pockets and all sorts of wonderful pages and collage techniques to fill books with. Check out all her lovely journal pages on flickr here.

I made this roll-up pencil pouch a while ago and had really been wanting to use the sewing/collage technique again. Super inspired I set out to make a Binder to match using the slip-cover method explained in Remains of the Day for the notebook cover.


I had a request for a Daily Record template in 8.5 x 11 – this is a bit different than the template included in the 4 x 6 set.

This free template includes the following areas:

  • → Date and day fields
  • → Large notes section
  • → 5 stars to rate the day
  • → Graph area for sketching and mock-ups
  • → A list area (to-do, grocery, shopping… )
  • → Tracking area (expenses, time, calories… )
  • → Owl shout-out!

Download:: daily-record.pdf (6923 downloads)

You still have plenty of months left to purchase the 8.5 by 11 printable calendar too, it goes through 2012 and is only $8! View it and the rest of the downloads here.

Thanks for reading, now go make something!

This is part two of the ‘Binder Series‘ – View part one here: The Bee Planner

The Repurposed Book Binder

The toughest part of this project is finding the perfect book. The spine of the book has to be a bit bigger than the height of the 2-ring metal binder piece, in this case it was one inch tall. Make sure it’s wide enough for a paper size you’re comfortable with too, remember to add about half the width of the binder clip.

Materials

  • → An old book
  • → Cheap 2-ring 3×5 notecard binder from office supply store
  • → Spray adhesive
  • DIY Planner Templates to fill the inside!

First you want to remove the pages from the inside of the book. It’s important to keep the very first and very last pages that are attached to the covers intact – these are called the endpapers. Go a few pages into the first signature and spread the pages apart until you can see the stitching. Using an exacto knife carefully cut the thread.

Once you’ve cut all the threads look behind the first page, you should be able to pull the pages away from the endpaper. It will probably be attached with adhesive but should pull apart easily, especially if it’s an older book. Once the endpaper is released cut through the book tape with scissors to completely release the inside pages.

Do the same to the back of the book so that you’re left with only the cover and the endpapers.

Next, fold both endpapers open and mark/cut them so that they’re the width of the spine.

Use the spray adhesive and attach the endpapers to the spine. I put down the back section first then the front, but do whatever works best for you book. The white sheets of paper are to protect the rest of the book from the adhesive.

Attach a piece of extra endpaper to the spine to hide the seams. Depending on the construction of your book this may not be necessary.

Last I attached the 2-ring metal binder piece. Instructions for doing this are in The Bee Planner post.

Now the fun part, filling the binder up! Thanks for reading, now go make something.

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